Slider001w-744635_200x200

Things we did today in the Butterfly Room

Remarkable things we did today in the Butterfly room: ages 4-5-6
January 29, 2013
Today- at the art table, children in the Butterfly room were given an assortment of items they could choose from and freely create with. We did not tell them what to do what to “make”- nor how to make it.
Once they saw the items we provided, they got very excited and had their own ideas. They quickly got to “work,” attempting to execute their own plans using the materials!
They were never bored- nor frustrated, and they became more excited and more focused with each new item we added to the hodge podge they were to pick from.
There were recycled boxes and containers for them to use as they pleased, in many sizes and textures. We added recycled tops from items we have used at home and would normally throw away. These items interested them because they were unique- they were things children are familiar with- yet not used to being able to handle for their own purposes. We gave these particular and unusual items a “new life” by finding them a new purpose here.
This helps to introduce the children to the concept of the circle of life and a respect for the earth- as well as to be mindful of recycling so that we grow to become a less disposable society. (CDA, NAEYC and Uni Pre k guidelines!)
Children worked ambitiously slathering or pouring the glue and through trial and error made observations that involved judging the amount of quantity it took to hold a plastic bottle cap as opposed to a piece of wool or a toilet paper roll. This helps to skills of observation, reasoning, logic, brainstorming, and ultimately making decisions that solve problems!
If we do not allow children to opportunity to do these kinds of activities- or we just do arts and crafts projects where everyone makes “the same thing”- then they do not get an opportunity to observe- think, plan- and develop the skill to execute their desires.
That’s why we say that child generated art is “the process, not the product” that counts!
Not only was this awesome- but many developmental milestones were evidenced in their work and their own growth and level or maturation showed in their abilities and concentrated efforts.
We look to children’s own art to see the developmental stages they are on, what they want to show us, – and what their motor skills are as well.
Art in early childhood is not supposed to be about the finished product, as in “arts and crafts”- it’s about the process. This means the process of being able to freely explore the materials and draw conclusions about what those materials can or cannot do, to meet the needs of what you are trying to “make!”
Children learn motor control skills when given the opportunity to control their own materials- glue- paint- etc., and they activate their minds to think and make plans as to how they want to make something they want to show us.
You can guess that some of these “creations” show what the children are currently interested in-some are rockets- some are cars- and some were just done for the pleasure of satisfying their own physical act of “doing,” and are simply “pretty” or pleasing to look at by texture , pattern or grouping of elements.
Working with the materials was a pleasurable experience for those that just randomly placed items- and those that consciously decided to create “something” were more seriously involved and deep in thought as they worked on their items.
These developmental steps are actually called “random placement” and conscious decision- and we look for the children’s developmental stages in their art that evidence these stages. That is why allowing children to do this kind of work is so important.
We don’t scold them for using “too much glue”- or getting dirty, or wasting the paper- these items are all part of the learning process.
They have to learn to use their own bodies to hold the glue and get it out of the bottle- or slather it onto a box well enough for it to hold a heavier item like a bottle top- these are all observations they must make and store in their own minds for future use.
If we do not give them the opportunity to participate in activities like this then they do not have the experience of trial and error, learning to focus, observing and drawing conclusions- or predicting outcome.
The children joyously slathered glue using small brushes they dipped in the bottle- then realized they needed thicker brushes to put enough glue across the sides of the big boxes.
Here they observed while they were interacting, and by experience made a judgment that suited their needs, which was to change the brush size!
That is evidence of growth and maturation in the decision-making process. It’s a developmental milestone for this age as well- they solved a problem by making a decision based on need. This implies an application of logic as well as brainstorming- that is a very big developmental deal for them to have achieved here!
They also told us what they were making, if they happened to have an idea- and described the details of what they were adding to the item- to make it the way they wanted it. Some also collaborated with each other- and built an item together. They were able to stretch across a giant table reaching for what they needed- borrow from each other or share things- it was an awesome teamwork experience as well as creative individual sojourn for all.
The children in the Butterfly room were given an assortment of items they could choose from and freely create with. We did not tell them what to do- what to “make”- nor how to make it.
Once they saw the items we provided, they got very excited and had their own ideas. They quickly got to “work,” attempting to execute their own plans using the materials!
They were never bored- nor frustrated, and they became more excited and more focused with each new item we added to the hodge podge they were to pick from.
There were recycled boxes and containers for them to use as they pleased, in many sizes and textures. We added recycled tops from items we have used at home and would normally throw away. These items interested them because they were unique- they were things children are familiar with- yet not used to being able to handle for their own purposes. We gave these particular and unusual items a “new life” by finding them a new purpose here.
This helps to introduce the children to the concept of the circle of life and a respect for the earth- as well as to be mindful of recycling so that we grow to become a less disposable society. (CDA, NAEYC and Uni Pre k guidelines!)
Children worked ambitiously slathering or pouring the glue and through trial and error made observations that involved judging the amount of quantity it took to hold a plastic bottle cap as opposed to a piece of wool or a toilet paper roll. This helps to skills of observation, reasoning, logic, brainstorming, and ultimately making decisions that solve problems!
If we do not allow children to opportunity to do these kinds of activities- or we just do arts and crafts projects where everyone makes “the same thing”- then they do not get an opportunity to observe- think, plan- and develop the skill to execute their desires.
That’s why we say that child generated art is “the process, not the product” that counts!
Not only was this awesome- but many developmental milestones were evidenced in their work and their own growth and level or maturation showed in their abilities and concentrated efforts.
We look to children’s own art to see the developmental stages they are on, what they want to show us, – and what their motor skills are as well.
Art in early childhood is not supposed to be about the finished product, as in “arts and crafts”- it’s about the process. This means the process of being able to freely explore the materials and draw conclusions about what those materials can or cannot do, to meet the needs of what you are trying to “make!”
Children learn motor control skills when given the opportunity to control their own materials- glue- paint- etc., and they activate their minds to think and make plans as to how they want to make something they want to show us.
You can guess that some of these “creations” show what the children are currently interested in-some are rockets- some are cars- and some were just done for the pleasure of satisfying their own physical act of “doing,” and are simply “pretty” or pleasing to look at by texture , pattern or grouping of elements.
Working with the materials was a pleasurable experience for those that just randomly placed items- and those that consciously decided to create “something” were more seriously involved and deep in thought as they worked on their items.
These developmental steps are actually called “random placement” and conscious decision- and we look for the children’s developmental stages in their art that evidence these stages. That is why allowing children to do this kind of work is so important.
We don’t scold them for using “too much glue”- or getting dirty, or wasting the paper- these items are all part of the learning process.
They have to learn to use their own bodies to hold the glue and get it out of the bottle- or slather it onto a box well enough for it to hold a heavier item like a bottle top- these are all observations they must make and store in their own minds for future use.
If we do not give them the opportunity to participate in activities like this then they do not have the experience of trial and error, learning to focus, observing and drawing conclusions- or predicting outcome.
The children joyously slathered glue using small brushes they dipped in the bottle- then realized they needed thicker brushes to put enough glue across the sides of the big boxes.
Here they observed while they were interacting, and by experience made a judgment that suited their needs, which was to change the brush size!
That is evidence of growth and maturation in the decision-making process. It’s a developmental milestone for this age as well- they solved a problem by making a decision based on need. This implies an application of logic as well as brainstorming- that is a very big developmental deal for them to have achieved here!
They also told us what they were making, if they happened to have an idea- and described the details of what they were adding to the item- to make it the way they wanted it. Some also collaborated with each other- and built an item together. They were able to stretch across a giant table reaching for what they needed- borrow from each other or share things- it was an awesome teamwork experience as well as creative individual sojourn for all.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>